An introduction to Dewey from the Teen Librarian

It’s the time of year when inductions start happening for new students, or we start thinking about how we introduce the library to our incoming Year 7 students.   This introduction is from Matt Imrie, blogger at Teen Librarian.  If you haven’t yet discovered this wonderful resource, then sign up today!  Matt has created one of the best fun introductions to Dewey – in my opinion! – with this fun activity using the Dewey Decimal Classification card game.  Playable in several ways, Matt provides the rules and a free download of beautifully visual cards.  Feel free to use this resource – but remember to credit the Teen Librarian!

If you have any great induction activities you’d like to share, please contact me.

The Write Path

Has your school ever taken part in the wonderful collaborative writing project called The Write Path, run by Bev Humphrey?  Mine has – and I can tell you it is a wonderful and enriching experience.  Students carry on writing each others stories, all around the world, so that the completion of a story can take 24 hours and go all around the world!  Students get the chance to Skype with the school before or after them – my school loved talking to the school in Australia which had kangaroos in the distance!  To find out more about how your school can take part in this wonderful collaborative project, see this page on Heart.

#GreatSchoolLibraries – a great campaign!

With my other ‘hat’ on, Chair of CILIP School Libraries Group, I am really proud to tell you about the new campaign backed by CILIP that was launched at our 2018 Conference.  The Great School Libraries campaign was launched by CEO Nick Poole in his opening speech. Working closely together with the SLA – School Librarians Association – CILIP, CILIPSLG and SLA are campaigning for the end of the closures of school libraries all over the UK.  Not only that but we would like to go further and we are stating that every secondary school should have a professionally staffed, fully funded library.  Please follow the link to register your support for this campaign, and to watch the presentation to see how we hope to achieve this together.

How the library supports students in a Hampshire school

Jo tells us of her work in promoting wellbeing in her school.

I wanted to share some work I have done regarding wellbeing for Students with other librarians as I am aware this is a growing area of concern for schools, which may fall within our gifts to support.

I’ve been in my role as Library Assistant at a large Hampshire secondary school since the end of September, when I changed careers having spent a few years at home with my young daughter. I’ve learnt so much about working with teenagers and in a school but have so much more to learn!

I was originally asked to host an assembly for every year group at our large secondary school , providing an outline of how the library can support them. Feeling fairly confident of what I would say to the lower years who are much more engaged with reading than the older GCSE years, I wondered what was the best angle to approach it from that felt interesting and relevant to the students. So I created a very short anonymous survey and asked the following questions:

– what is important to their friends right right now?
-what is exciting their friends?
-what are the challenges facing their friends?

I pitched it from the ‘friends’ angle to enable students to be more likely to open up about others than themselves. Distributing the survey to all in Year 10 and 11, I received many results within 24 hours that highlighted some very interesting themes, so I decided to roll the survey out to all year groups. About 80% of tutor groups completed these surveys, the results of which were very enlightening.

The main theme that ran across the year groups was the importance of ‘gaming’ – I’d never heard of Fortnite, the X-box game, before reading the survey responses but I made sure I read about it afterwards as about 60% of all surveys across the year groups mentioned this as important and exciting! Anxiety was a common thread, the ’causes’ of which differed between the year groups. Years 7-9 suggested anxiety was mainly due to navigating difficult friendships, starting to think about choosing options, and completing a lot of homework. Years 10 and 11 suggested anxiety stemmed from a pressure to achieve in their exams (self imposed or from family), coping with the amount of revision, balancing revision with hobbies, not having enough time to do everything, eating poorly, worry about starting college, and concern over what they are going to do after college. Interestingly spending too much time on phones/gaming was also cited as a cause of stress!

I took the survey results and looked at how well the library supporting the emerging themes of Wellbeing and Gaming and worked with Peters to identify a bespoke book list relevant for these themes. I also looked at the Literacy Trust’s article on GameLit which proposes a new genre, of fiction set in the same alternative realities to what users of video games experience. https://www.booktrust.org.uk/whats-happening/blogs/2018/january/5-virtual-reality-books-for-your-gaming-mad-tweens-and-teens/

I captured images of the new books that were coming in and included these in my assembly presentation, as well as creating a ‘New in the Library” display in the corridor outside the library

For Years 10 and 11 I drew upon the wisdom of Danielle Marchant, founder of the Pause retreats who had previously acted as my business coach when I was working in a senior HR role in Asia. Danielle, who had experienced burnout and set about to design the retreats that she needed but weren’t available, is the author of “Pause@ by Octopus books https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pause-press-pause-before-life/dp/1912023091 and we came up with 5 tips to Pause that were relevant for Years 10 and 11.

These included
1) Breathe – I demonstrated the different between belly breathing which we do when relaxed and fast upper body breathing that we do under stress
2)Worry Jar – the act of writing down your worries and putting them in a jar, taking the worrying thought out of your brain and onto paper helps you to question if it really is something worth worrying about, stopping your mind worrying over and over about the issue causing it to be bigger than it really is, freeing up space to concentrate on other things!
3) Importance of Blank space – allocated unstructured time to help deal with the constant busyness of their life. This also included tips on using their phones less – e.g. not charging overnight in their bedrooms, switching off devices two hours before bed and picking up a book instead, ‘see the Sky before a screen’.
4) the importance of getting outside to re-energise – whether its walking the dog, playing football with friends, going for a run or eating your lunch outside
5) Readaxation – I referred to Nicola Morgan’s work on Readaxation and positioned this as the link between the library and wellbeing. That by finding a great book they can lose themselves in will help them reach ‘flow’ and take their mind off their anxieties or exams, as well as helping them sleep if reading before bed!

I signposted the following categories of books to them:

Wellbeing

GameLit

Young Adult

Since the assemblies, the books have flown out with reservations constantly being made. The GameLit has certainly been popular with the boys, they have been shocked to find something that taps into their game playing passions!
I am also hoping to set up a ‘Thrive’ lunchtime club to support wellbeing, and am in discussions about inviting Nicola Morgan in to the school to speak to Year 10 and 11 students, as well as parents, in October as they enter the crucial GCSE years.

If you’d like to know more about the Pause, visit www.lifebydanielle.com or contact me directly.

A (school) librarian abroad

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to transport yourself to work in another country?  International Schools very often advertise, but what would it really be like to take up that offer?  Marion Prickett tells all…

In August 2014 I set off on the biggest adventure of my life. After a whirlwind of interviews, packing and moving I was off to Malaysia as the first Librarian at Epsom College in Malaysia. I would like to say that in true Librarian style I carefully researched by new home and workplace, but there was no time for that and so I arrived to the heat and humidity of the tropics in high summer. I enjoy something different and a challenge and I got both. Unfortunately, the building programme was delayed and so our accommodation was not ready, however, what we lost in permanent accommodation we gained in team building and bonding. We started off with about 28 academic staff, and a small but vital team of admin staff. The school opened after three weeks of hard slog to try and turn a recently handed over building site into a functioning school of 140 students. The College had intentionally omitted recruiting for years 11 and 13 as it would be unreasonable to expect a start-up to run exams at the end of the first year.

The library was bare when I arrived, the furniture was in plastic wrapping, the books were a far off dream, there were no computers for the students and my assistant, Atiqah and I had one laptop between us. Luckily I had bought my MacBook. The lack of computers hardly mattered as the internet was inadequate. We borrowed books from families to cover the first weeks and thanks to a brilliant idea from Val Dewhurst (QEGS) we appeared to display books we had ordered on the shelves.

By half term we had taken delivery of 3,500 books – not as many as I expected but there had been some adjustments to the book order, we also had nearly 300 DVDs, various online resources, some locally bought resources, a really good selection of posters and surprisingly happy Library users. Unfortunately, when the Library management system was eventually installed and the data loaded it was found to be flawed and everything had to be re-entered. Right from the beginning the library had been running lessons for students from nursery to Year 7 – this was later extended to year 8. I did induction sessions and teachers enthusiastically used the library.

I visited any book shops I could find, although they were very few and I really had to travel to Kuala Lumpur, over an hour’s drive away. The Malaysians are very kind and helpful and our local staff helped us all to feel welcome and at home.

I am now in my fourth and final year at Epsom College in Malaysia and it has been the best working years of my life. Unfortunately, if I am to see my husband for more than two short visits a year then I have to return to the UK where he works.

The pluses of living and working in Malaysia? The best job ever. I have worked in a fabulous school with colleagues to match. I am a Head of Department, I have an excellent assistant, I am never questioned about how I run the Library because I am trusted. The governors come and say hello whenever they come to the College for meetings. I feel as if my contribution and opinions really matters to the life of the College. I have been expected to join academic committees, I help to run a competition with other international school librarians to challenge our readers. I choose the stock. I am well paid by international standards and very well paid by UK standards, I have a benefits package exactly the same as the teachers – because I am on a par with them, including ID90 which gives us 90% off the price of Air Asia flights. I suffer none of the problems commonly encountered by many UK school Librarians.

The minuses about living and working in Malaysia? There are very few. Family are a long way away, Skype is great for day to day contact but it is still a long way and the difference in time zones means it can be difficult to keep in touch. It often takes longer to get things done than in the UK, The College is a long drive from anywhere, when we first arrived the nearest really nice supermarket was about an hour’s drive away, or it was a trip to Kuala Lumpur. I don’t like chillies and spices – a real disadvantage when even babies chew on a chilli (OK, not quite but they are definitely brought up on spicy food). I wish we had all been encouraged to learn the local language of Bahasa or Mandarin. Living on campus means it is hard to switch off (which I am not very good at anyway). There are some very unpleasant diseases here that have no cure. You are recommended to have rabies jabs if you plan to do anything wild and adventurous, dengue fever is vicious as my colleagues who have suffered can testify. The heat can be over-powering – thank goodness for good quality air con – everywhere. The driving standards are very different to the UK. I imagine if you lived in Kuala Lumpur it would be very easy to spend money on food and entertainment. Not a problem out here as almost the only booze is on the campus – the local commercial/retail development is owned by the local mosque and unsurprisingly they do not permit their tenants to sell alcohol.

Back in the summer of 2016, I visited Epsom College, UK. I wanted to see their library – I love to visit different libraries and see if I can improve what I do and share my ideas too. My headmaster mentioned exchanges often and so I suggested to the UK Librarian that we might be the trail blazers for this scheme which at that point was really only an idea. On returning to ECiM I suggested the idea to the headmaster who agreed, although I am not sure how certain he was it would come to anything. Anyway, Sue Nichols and I organised the exchange between us, kept our schools informed, sorted out paperwork (there was a surprising amount), and then in January swapped our lives. I inherited her lovely house in Dorking, her cat, and her job, including her three assistants. I had the easiest end of it as I am obviously familiar with life in the UK, although the cold was colder than I remembered! The staff at ECUK were very welcoming and kind, especially the Library assistants. The library provides lots of resources to year nine for various projects they undertake across the curriculum, year 12s and 13s were frequent library users and small groups used the Languages room on one side of the Library. Year 7and 8 also use the library weekly for silent reading. Epsom having been established since the mid 1800s has very impressive archives in the dungeons, clearly a lot of time and effort have gone into the creation, care and use of these. ECUK has twice as many students as ECiM and all in years 7 and above, this gives the school a very busy, bustling feel. It was surprising how small a group of Year 6s looked when they visited the school as part of their student recruitment programme. ECUK have an excellent book supplier who was extremely helpful – and so quick to deliver. I felt enormously envious as quick book delivery is something we cannot do. There are book suppliers in Malaysia but their stock is not as wide or diverse as UK suppliers. It was strange driving into work again and the state of Surrey roads was a shock – definitely worse than Malaysian roads. However, the joy of going home at weekends – I only had to work one Saturday during the exchange instead of almost every one as I do in Malaysia – was fantastic.

Since I have been back, everyone has asked if the College in the UK is ‘better’ – no it isn’t, but it isn’t worse either. It is different. ECUK is a traditional English boarding school with a long and proud history which they are very aware of, it caters for 11-18 year olds, the vast majority of whom have English as their home language. This makes some things easier but it is surprising how quickly you miss the diversity we have. Here our students range in age from 3 years old to 18+years old. Only a minority have English as their home language although many are very proficient in English as well as one two and sometimes more languages. So the voices raised in our corridors are often higher and beyond my comprehension whilst in ECUK you most hear English spoken by more mature voices as students in both places hurry from one class to another.

I would recommend anyone who can to do such an exchange, it is always interesting to see your life and career from a different perspective. You cannot help learn new things and take away new experiences. You will see things differently to your exchange partner and may be able to make useful suggestions, if you are a little nervous of working overseas but think it might be for you then this may be an excellent way to test the water and see how you like it.

Go on, go to the International Jobs section on the TES website and see what is there. You might surprise yourself. I did and love it.

Marion Prickett

College Librarian.

Epsom College in Malaysia.

library@epsomcollege.edu.my

A book award with a difference – Trinity Schools Book Award

The Trinity Schools Book Award was originally set up for a group of independent schools in the South East of England.   Now in it’s fourth year, it has expanded to include other schools who would like to join.  I have to declare an interest, in that I am part of this group, but that is not the only reason I am writing about this on Heart.

School Librarians around the country – and local School Library Services (where they still exist) have set up book awards all around the country.  To see the variety of these look at the Local Book Awards tab on Heart.  One, quite notably, has become a national award because it is so unique – the Excelsior Award which is the only book award to focus solely on Graphic Novels.  This award is the brainchild of Paul Register, who was a school librarian when he set it up, and now is an independent trainer who teaches on the importance of graphic novels.

So with this plethora of local book awards, why am I flagging up the Trinity Schools Book Award as being a bit different?  Well, we believe that our USP is that alongside the normal book reviews and reading the books, we have set up a Creative Response Review.  The responses from the pupils to the books has been quite staggering!  I thought that their responses deserved a wider audience, and that this is perhaps something that you might consider for your award as well.  The creative response brings out a different side to the books, and the authors are usually delighted.  Sarah Govett, who won this year’s Award with her book The Territory delightedly tweeted screenshots of the responses to her book after the winning announcement.  To look at the Creative Responses to this year’s books on the theme of A New World, click on the link. You can see Creative Responses from other years as well, including an Everest cake, a lego response to Mortal Engines, a sea shanty, a piece of music, cosplay, and much more!  Look under the Creative Responses tab on the website to see the other four years.  Click on the logo at the start of this piece to visit the website – and enjoy!

School Librarians Network – our lifeline!

Do you belong to the internet group School Librarians Network yet?  If not, I really have to ask, why not?  SLN is a lifeline for school librarians everywhere.  Many of us are solo librarians, without anyone else to bounce ideas off, unlike teachers who have departmental colleagues to do that with.  Therefore many of us struggle on, inventing everything from scratch, creating everything and not having anyone to consult about problems that are solely library related.  Well, SLN is the answer to that!  Started by the inspirational Elizabeth Bentley more than 15 years ago – and I have certainly been a member for that long and it wasn’t new then – SLN was a Yahoo Group.  It is a safe place to bounce ideas around, ask Dewey queries, ask LMS questions, share problems and find a sympathetic ear, ask copyright questions and much, much more! SLN has a wealth of files that members can access, where generous librarians have shared displays, book lists and quizzes.  You need only to ask, and generally somebody else has done that and will share with you.

The reason why I am writing about this now – although it is always a good time to join SLN – is that Elizabeth has migrated the group from a Yahoo group to a Groups.io group instead.  This is a more reliable platform, and will give the group greater flexibility.  All of the files have been migrated too, so years of work has not been lost.  All current members were automatically migrated, but if you are reading this and are thinking that you need to belong to this inspirational community – and who wouldn’t! – then the joining details have changed.  Simply send an email to: SLN+subscribe@groups.io to join the community.  See you there!

Image courtesy of Britannica Image Quest.

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The Mixed Blessings of Book Donations

Following a heated discussion about book donations on Twitter over the new year, Barbara Band who is a School Library, Literacy and Reading Consultant and a retired school librarian with many years of experience behind her, wrote this piece for Heart about what do you do with inappropriate donations? and should you have a policy for donations at all?

School libraries need to be well-stocked with a wide range of resources for all ages and abilities. Not just fiction books but also non-fiction to support the curriculum, provide inspiration for students’ interests and exploration of whatever piques their curiosity. School libraries cater for very specific needs, some of these will be the same in every school but each with have its own peculiarities: the curriculum, the interests of students which can vary wildly – a town with a local ice hockey team is likely to have a large proportion of the student body interested in the sport and I’ve worked in schools where there was a huge interest in fishing yet none of my local colleagues reported the same – and every school librarian will have a wish list of specific titles; the next book in a series, a new publication by a popular author, something they’ve seen in a bookshop that will fit in well with the collection.
In a time of budget constraints stocking a school library that fits all these parameters can be hard to achieve so donations can be useful. However, I would often find that the donations turned out to be inappropriate, nevertheless I still said “yes” every time somebody said “I’m clearing out some books, would you like them”?
Why? Because you never know what gems you might find – after all, one day there may be a Harry Potter first edition that you could sell for vast sums (I wish!). But alongside that yes would be the caveat that the library had a stock selection policy* and that anything that wasn’t suitable would be offered to departments first and then given to charity. I never had a single person say they weren’t happy with that.
So how did I decide what to keep?
• The first assessment would be on the condition of the book or magazine. Was it in a reasonable state with no sticky substances or pages falling out? Was it damaged or defaced?

• Fiction – if it was a popular book then I would keep it for additional copies. If it was something that I didn’t think would be borrowed (for example, where I already had the book with a more up-to-date cover or it was by an author who was no longer read) then I would use it for the “reading boxes” that I stocked in every tutor group or put it in my regular book sale to raise funds for new stock. If the book was recent and “as new” I would consider it for a library competition prize.

• Non-fiction – these were assessed for relevance to the curriculum, accuracy and whether they were up-to-date. School librarians struggle to get others to understand that we constantly need to weed our stock. As librarians, our task is to help students find the information they need, to guide them to a book they may enjoy, and the ultimate aim is for students to become readers for pleasure and independent learners, finding what they want without our intervention. We cannot stand over every student and check what they have taken off the shelves – if a student does their homework using an out-of-date library book and gets it wrong, who is at fault? Facts change over time – we no longer have nine planets – and even recipe books have to be treated with caution. Older ones would not give guidance regarding unpasteurised products and pregnancy.

• Basically any book I added to the shelves from donations had to supplement or enhance what I already had. After that, any surplus fiction that I didn’t want I would pass to the English department for their classroom libraries although rather than dump piles of books on them, I’d catch staff when in the library and ask them to look through them.

• Likewise, if there were any books that I felt would be useful to the SEN department (fiction and non-fiction) then I would pass on these too.

• Non-fiction books would be distributed to relevant departments – again, I would remove anything that was horrendously out-of-date or in poor condition. Departmental libraries are different from the school library. Teachers are able to direct students towards particular chapters where the information is still relevant, for example, the section on gravity in a science encyclopaedia is unlikely to date whereas information about space travel would need to be checked.

• Some books, whilst not suitable for any of the above, could still be used – for papercrafts in the library, as backing paper for quotes, I’ve even used falling-apart graphic novels to create bookmarks (the Simpson’s ones were very popular!).

• The (hopefully) diminishing pile left would be taken to a charity shop – I know my local one collects books not suitable for sale and sells them for pulp so I feel that not only am I helping the charity but also the environment. However, there were always some books which wouldn’t even be suitable for this so those would be put directly into the recycle bin.
School libraries have limited space and each book needs to “earn its keep” on the shelves; keeping old and tatty books in case somebody might want to borrow them means no space for the new books. I’ve weeded sections before and been asked by students and staff whether I’ve bought more books – the old stuff hides the new! School libraries also rarely have store rooms so books that are removed usually have to be disposed of and we can’t stock a book on every single possible thing we may be asked for. Do continue to think about your school library when donating books but please don’t expect them to keep everything and maybe have a sort out of them first to save the librarian that trip to the charity shop?
* A stock selection policy should give the rationale for why stock is selected or rejected. A statement such as: “Resources are selected to ensure stock is of a high quality, current and appropriate. They form part of a balanced collection, providing cultural diversity, differing perspectives and viewpoints, without bias and stereotyping. Resources include a range of formats to support each subject as well as individual learning styles. Any donations will be considered in the same way.”

Barbara Band
School Library, Reading and Literacy Consultant

Creating an online book club: professional development for school library staff

This is a guest blog post from Elizabeth Hutchinson (@Elizabethutch) If you wish to join in, please either contact her on Twitter or on this email: ehutchinson@library.gg

Elizabeth Hutchinson is Head of Schools’ Library Service in Guernsey. She is a chartered librarian with special interests in school libraries.  This includes raising the profile of school libraries and qualified librarians through advocacy, promoting the importance of information literacy within the curriculum and working alongside teachers using technology to support independent learning for students. She was runner-up in LILAC 2016 information literacy award and is also an international speaker.

I have always felt that I do not read enough non-fiction for my own professional development. I regularly read the CILIP Update and The School librarian, which if I am honest, amounts to a quick flick through unless something really shouts out to me. I enjoyed reading non-fiction when I was studying for my degree and then my masters, and when I think about this I realised that it was because there was a purpose to it. Professional development is a journey and part of my journey was about understanding that I find reading non-fiction very difficult without a reason.

Social media changed my professional development journey when I began to understand how I could use it to support my own learning. No longer did I have to hunt out the information that would be useful for me. If I was following the right people they would be curating the useful articles and research that I needed for my role as a librarian. I have read far more because of these wonderful people who are so willing to share and encourage discussion.

However, I still had this niggling feeling that I should be reading non-fiction books but knowing what to read or finding the incentive was difficult for me. I have run a fiction book club with a group of my friends for over 5 years now. What I have learnt from this book group is that there are real benefits from letting others choose the books. I have read several that I would never have picked up on my own and I have enjoyed discussing the books I have not enjoyed as much as the ones that I have.

The moment to start a PD online book club came out of the blue. I had done no research. I did not know what platform I was going to use. I did not have a list of books and if I am honest I did not know I was going to do this until the moment I decided to respond to the last question on the first ever twitter chat for #ukslachat. “What is going to be your new years resolution? If you are making one” I posted this response without really thinking about it. “I would like to start a #PD non-fiction book club. Probably online. Anyone interested?” I immediately had 5 responses saying that if I did they would love to join in.

For those of you that don’t know me should know that I am the kind of person who is very spontaneous. I do have a lot of experience and knowledge of school library services and if I think something feels right I am the kind of person to give it a go and learn by my mistakes rather than spending hours weighing up the problems or consequences. This is why I then found myself trying to work out how I was going to make this book club happen.

A little planning and thought did have to go into the next bit and luckily I do have a good knowledge of twitter hashtags, padlet platforms and access to a lot of lovely librarians who wanted to join in. Once I realised that I would not have to come up with the list of books and the librarians were willing to share books that they wanted to read I knew that this could be done and the new online non-fiction book club (#nonfbc) was born.

I have created a page on padlet that anyone who messages me via Direct Message through twitter can have access to. I have tried to keep it small but maybe this is not manageable so will have to monitor this. There is also a twitter hashtag #nonfbc for comments. We chose the first book Reading by Right: Successful strategies to ensure every child can read to succeed on the 5th December and will chat about it on the 23rd January. I think I will be using both platforms for the discussion as not everyone is on twitter or in the same time zone. There will be a set time for each discussion but anyone can join in at a later time/date if they wish. I still need to think about questions for our discussion but that will happen as I read this first book. I think that is all I need to do for now so it is just a case of watching and learning as I go along.

If you would like to join in just get in touch and come along for the ride. It may not be perfect but hopefully we will all learn something on this journey.

Photo by Rita Morais on Unsplash

 

 

 

Christmas TV 2017 – Books into Film

This is the most eagerly anticipated and read post every year!  The wonderful Helen Smith from Eckington School in Derbyshire produces a guide to Christmas TV every year, linking films to books.  A great opportunity to promote reading!  Helen provides this for free every year, and she allows free distribution.  However, please ensure that you acknowledge her as the author of this guide.  Also, Helen asks that if you enjoy this guide you consider donating to the page she has set up for the National Literacy Trust.