This is what you’ve been waiting for!

This post is so eagerly anticipated that I have had people emailing me to ask when it is ready!  Every year, the talented Helen Smith from Eckington School in Derbyshire compiles this wonderful Christmas TV list – full of films made from books.  This year the design is even more stunning.  Feel free to download and share, but please ensure that Helen’s hard work is credited.

Using Microsoft Sway to raise the profile of the library

School Librarian Barbara Ferramosca tells us about her initiative in using Microsoft Sway to promote her library in King’s College School.

My library has recently started to use the Microsoft app Sway as a way to promote our books and library resources with great success: as a Librarian I have always felt that our OPAC/Library Management System or the VLE used in school were not quite the right tools for the job and we needed to find something more in keeping with the times. Sway is the answer that I was looking for.

The app Sway is Microsoft’s response to the popularity of Prezi and it is part of our school Office 365 package. It is basically a more fun and visually appealing version of PowerPoint. It is very user-friendly too because it requires little training to create something that looks professional and bring together different types of media in one platform.

Here are some examples of our Sways:
https://sway.office.com/l6vBhYnB9d43OeUh?ref=Link
https://sway.office.com/7UndbOsdUSKCNBLm?ref=Link
https://sway.office.com/lzD0Eq0im28sTO2C?ref=Link

These Sways display without any problems on all types of phones too: the text and images automatically adapt to the size of the mobile phone screens.

What did we want to achieve?

Marketing and Raising the profile of the library. Sway can be easily embedded on Facebook and on Twitter: I have always wanted to use social media to promote new books and our recommendations but I have never been able to do so because I found that running a library account was very time-consuming and I could never quite ascertain the impact of my efforts towards lending figures, for example. Now we send our weekly Sways to the school marketing team so that I can use the school social media channels instead: a quick survey with our students has reassured me that students tend to follow the school Twitter account anyway for more practical reasons (i.e. info about sport fixtures, music or drama events, etc.) so this was a guaranteed way to reach them. Using the school account has another benefit too: it raises the profile of our library and we can also regularly highlight our expertise to the school community (including SMT), our parents and other possible stakeholders such as governors, ex-pupils and the general public. Finally, on a more practical level, we are helping the school marketing team who are really grateful as they sometimes struggle to find materials or information to publish on social media.

Promotion. Sway is a brilliant tool to promote the library books in a new and more exciting way because it is a very visual tool for a very visual generation. The following are just some examples of what we have been able to do:

– Booklists with book covers, quick blurbs and hyperlinks to Amazon. We quickly discounted hyperlinks to our library OPAC for these reasons: students are already familiar with Amazon and use it much more often than our library catalogue; they can read the book reviews about the book and even the beginning of the book before making the decision to borrow the book. It just works.

– Students like to discover what their peers/friends like to read so now I am finally able to add these peer-recommendations or the top ten books of the week for example. Beforehand, I used to display these recommendations on displays or on the library shelves but it always felt like a lot of work for a small audience overall. I have given my pupil librarians the task of creating book reviews in podcast form so we will be adding these soon: it will be another way to integrate peer-recommendations into our newsletter.

– I finally have a way  to add video book trailers from Youtube or even podcasts – I have never found a way to use them until now. A lot of publishers produce trailers for new books and they can be extremely successful at catching the attention of a reader. The feedback from the students has been extremely positive – they REALLY like the trailers.

There are so many other possibilities that we have not yet fully explored: in our first Sway, we created galleries of students’ artwork based on their summer reading. It is worth exploring this app to see how it can work for your library.

Library lessons. In our school, the English department is keen to bring their classes in the library for students to read or choose a new book. We found that sometimes students are lost when faced with so much choice around the library, especially the more reluctant readers. Creating regular Sways has provided a new format for these particular lessons. The week before October half-term, we invited all the Year 9 classes to the library and asked the students to go online (either on their phones or using our computers) and just browse/read/listen/watch our last two to three Sways. It was a success especially as the teacher made clear that they were expected to borrow a book by the end of the lesson. They responded well to the combination of clear expectation and also to the fact that they could freely explore. It did not feel prescriptive because they had so much choice. I am now treating each Sway with the same care and attention as I would every lesson: I try to think about the audience that I want to target and then add content appropriately.

Final considerations. Making our Sways on a weekly basis works for us for the reasons explained above. Overall, creating a weekly Sway can be very time-consuming so this is why I think that it is extremely important to use it in as many different ways as possible. The amount of effort invested into creating each Sway needs to strategically work in several different ways to make it worth it. However, as we all know, every school is its own micro-cosmos so what works for us may not necessarily be possible for another librarian. Sway is just a brilliant new tool in the Librarian’s arsenal to reach our school community in a different way.

 

The January Challenge from 64 Million artists

I asked this organisation to write a blog post about their initiative, because it sounded so wonderful, and I know a lot of you would love to take part in this!

‘Cultivating an open and accessible culture of learning? Encouraging creativity and collaboration? Developing dynamic spaces for staff and students to experiment and have fun together?

Have you heard about The January Challenge?

64 Million Artists believe everyone is creative, and when we use our creativity we can make positive change in our lives and the world around us. We think school libraries are amazing. And, as spaces of creativity and community, libraries make a very happy and inspiring home for The January Challenge.

Creativity is already in our lives, sometimes it just needs a little spark to wake it up or a quick reminder that it’s easy to access. That’s why in January, a month notorious for making us feel blue, we run The January Challenge – free and fun creative challenges every day for 31 days. The idea is simple. For each day in January we set a short creative challenge which only takes 5 to 10 minutes to complete. The challenge might be to write a poem about Mondays, to doodle to music, think your way around a problem or make something taller than you. It is a fun, quick and accessible way to get creative – and getting creative is good for you.

In 2019, over 15,000 people across the country took part. Over 95% of those surveyed said it had a positive impact on their wellbeing. Creative challenges took place in schools, hospitals, libraries, theatres, offices, community centres and homes across the country. We heard about flash mobs in school canteens, paper aeroplanes flying around libraries and friendships born online, and over a cuppa.

We have recently partnered with UCL Division of Psychology and Life Sciences to find out if our online creativity programmes really impacted symptoms of stress depression and anxiety and the overall wellbeing of our participants.

The research results found a ‘clinically meaningful’ increase in participants’ wellbeing and an overall decrease in symptoms of stress, depression and anxiety. Interview data also reflected that participants felt their well, supported and socially connected by taking part in simple creative activities online. Read the short report here.

Unlock the key to wellbeing in your school. Use The January Challenge to boost collaboration, connection and creativity for both staff and students. School libraries make an excellent ‘hub’ for Challenges – but they could also be used in staff meetings, tutor time, lunchtime clubs, in lessons! How could you use them in your school?

The January Challenge is free to take part in, and we offer optional extras to help you champion creativity across your whole school. Find all the information you need here, or get in touch at jemima@64millionartists.com. ‘

 

Phil’s amazing offer!

As you may know, Phil Bradley retired at the beginning of this year, but fortunately it’s still possible to make use of his expertise. He has produced two courses in video format aimed at information professionals, Apps for Librarians and Advanced Internet Searching. Each course consists of 40 or more videos covering different aspects of the appropriate subject. The apps course covers subject areas such as browsers, guiding tools, making videos, multimedia tools, news apps, photography apps, presentation apps and so on. In fact, everything that you need in order to get the absolute most out of your smart phone or tablet, and versions of apps for both IOS and Android are included. The good news is that Phil has made this resource entirely free of charge for personal use. Simply visit his wiki at http://appsforlibrarians.pbworks.com/ and dig in!
The second video course on Advanced Internet Searching covers exactly that. There are a lot of videos on how to get the best out of Google, alternatives to Google, image search engines, multimedia searching, videos on specific search engines such as DuckDuckGo and Yandex. Phil also covers social media searching, multi search engines and much more. This collection is available for personal use for a one off fee of £20, and you will have complete access to the collection indefinitely. Phil is happy for you to use the videos in your own teaching sessions, and simply asks that you do not use them in any commercial form. If you want to know more, or wish to purchase the collection, email Phil at philipbradley@gmail.com for payment details.

Reading Flip Guides

This beautifully simple. yet effective idea was shared on the internet mailing group SLN, and I immediately asked the librarian, Gavin Jones from Melbourne Girls Grammar, if I could share this with all of you.  Gavin runs the website Read it! Loved it!  and tweets about his love of books at @readitlovedit 

The flipguides are a beautifully simple way for pupils to be independent in finding books, yet under the remote guidance of the librarian.  They are simple and cheap to put together, and easy to add and take away books from once made.  Laminated, they are durable and will survive much handling.  Gavin has agreed to share his template with us, so that everyone can build their own guides, and it can be found here on his website, where examples of the flipguides he has already built can be found.  If you do find this useful, a shout out to Gavin on Twitter would be great!

#GreatSchoolLibraries Campaign is officially launched!

I hope that most of you noticed that this wonderful Campaign was launched yesterday, 20th September 2018.  I was certainly busy on Twitter with it!

Most of you know that with my other hat on I am Chair of CILIP’s School Libraries Group, and in this capacity I am on the team that launched this initiative.  Working in partnership with Alison Tarrant of the School Library Association and with other partners, we have started a three year campaign with the objective of raising the profile of school libraries with the government, Ofsted and educational professionals everywhere.  Our aim is to get them to realise the value that a school library brings. and therefore to properly fund them where they exist, and put them back in schools where they have been taken out.

To this end, we would value your help!  We have a data collecting team who is compiling a lot of information to prove the value that we bring.  If you could help us by sending us a case study (or two!) on how you have made a difference to teaching and learning.  I am attaching a template here, and an exemplar case study for you to look at.  If you need any further help with this, please contact me on this page and I will put you in touch with someone on the team who can help.

On the website you will also find two wonderful posters to put up in your library, and an exercise for your students to do as well, celebrating your library and what it means to them.  You can send pictures of these to us – send them to me and I will put them on the page.

Let’s celebrate our #GreatSchoolLibraries!  Please tweet about your successes using that hashtag, and let’s make this three year Campaign make a difference!

Draft guide and template

Case study example

Research Smarter!

 

CILIP’s Information Literacy Group have produced a great set of research sheets aimed at schools, and even better, they have chosen to allow this as a free download for everyone.  They were originally created to go with the Teen Tech Awards, but they adapted them for use in all settings.  These ten sheets help students become information literate and smart researchers themselves.  Download them here. CILIPILG has also produced a very helpful new definition of what Information Literacy means in all sorts of contexts, and you can download that here.

An introduction to Dewey from the Teen Librarian

It’s the time of year when inductions start happening for new students, or we start thinking about how we introduce the library to our incoming Year 7 students.   This introduction is from Matt Imrie, blogger at Teen Librarian.  If you haven’t yet discovered this wonderful resource, then sign up today!  Matt has created one of the best fun introductions to Dewey – in my opinion! – with this fun activity using the Dewey Decimal Classification card game.  Playable in several ways, Matt provides the rules and a free download of beautifully visual cards.  Feel free to use this resource – but remember to credit the Teen Librarian!

If you have any great induction activities you’d like to share, please contact me.

How the library supports students in a Hampshire school

Jo tells us of her work in promoting wellbeing in her school.

I wanted to share some work I have done regarding wellbeing for Students with other librarians as I am aware this is a growing area of concern for schools, which may fall within our gifts to support.

I’ve been in my role as Library Assistant at a large Hampshire secondary school since the end of September, when I changed careers having spent a few years at home with my young daughter. I’ve learnt so much about working with teenagers and in a school but have so much more to learn!

I was originally asked to host an assembly for every year group at our large secondary school , providing an outline of how the library can support them. Feeling fairly confident of what I would say to the lower years who are much more engaged with reading than the older GCSE years, I wondered what was the best angle to approach it from that felt interesting and relevant to the students. So I created a very short anonymous survey and asked the following questions:

– what is important to their friends right right now?
-what is exciting their friends?
-what are the challenges facing their friends?

I pitched it from the ‘friends’ angle to enable students to be more likely to open up about others than themselves. Distributing the survey to all in Year 10 and 11, I received many results within 24 hours that highlighted some very interesting themes, so I decided to roll the survey out to all year groups. About 80% of tutor groups completed these surveys, the results of which were very enlightening.

The main theme that ran across the year groups was the importance of ‘gaming’ – I’d never heard of Fortnite, the X-box game, before reading the survey responses but I made sure I read about it afterwards as about 60% of all surveys across the year groups mentioned this as important and exciting! Anxiety was a common thread, the ’causes’ of which differed between the year groups. Years 7-9 suggested anxiety was mainly due to navigating difficult friendships, starting to think about choosing options, and completing a lot of homework. Years 10 and 11 suggested anxiety stemmed from a pressure to achieve in their exams (self imposed or from family), coping with the amount of revision, balancing revision with hobbies, not having enough time to do everything, eating poorly, worry about starting college, and concern over what they are going to do after college. Interestingly spending too much time on phones/gaming was also cited as a cause of stress!

I took the survey results and looked at how well the library supporting the emerging themes of Wellbeing and Gaming and worked with Peters to identify a bespoke book list relevant for these themes. I also looked at the Literacy Trust’s article on GameLit which proposes a new genre, of fiction set in the same alternative realities to what users of video games experience. https://www.booktrust.org.uk/whats-happening/blogs/2018/january/5-virtual-reality-books-for-your-gaming-mad-tweens-and-teens/

I captured images of the new books that were coming in and included these in my assembly presentation, as well as creating a ‘New in the Library” display in the corridor outside the library

For Years 10 and 11 I drew upon the wisdom of Danielle Marchant, founder of the Pause retreats who had previously acted as my business coach when I was working in a senior HR role in Asia. Danielle, who had experienced burnout and set about to design the retreats that she needed but weren’t available, is the author of “Pause@ by Octopus books https://www.amazon.co.uk/Pause-press-pause-before-life/dp/1912023091 and we came up with 5 tips to Pause that were relevant for Years 10 and 11.

These included
1) Breathe – I demonstrated the different between belly breathing which we do when relaxed and fast upper body breathing that we do under stress
2)Worry Jar – the act of writing down your worries and putting them in a jar, taking the worrying thought out of your brain and onto paper helps you to question if it really is something worth worrying about, stopping your mind worrying over and over about the issue causing it to be bigger than it really is, freeing up space to concentrate on other things!
3) Importance of Blank space – allocated unstructured time to help deal with the constant busyness of their life. This also included tips on using their phones less – e.g. not charging overnight in their bedrooms, switching off devices two hours before bed and picking up a book instead, ‘see the Sky before a screen’.
4) the importance of getting outside to re-energise – whether its walking the dog, playing football with friends, going for a run or eating your lunch outside
5) Readaxation – I referred to Nicola Morgan’s work on Readaxation and positioned this as the link between the library and wellbeing. That by finding a great book they can lose themselves in will help them reach ‘flow’ and take their mind off their anxieties or exams, as well as helping them sleep if reading before bed!

I signposted the following categories of books to them:

Wellbeing

GameLit

Young Adult

Since the assemblies, the books have flown out with reservations constantly being made. The GameLit has certainly been popular with the boys, they have been shocked to find something that taps into their game playing passions!
I am also hoping to set up a ‘Thrive’ lunchtime club to support wellbeing, and am in discussions about inviting Nicola Morgan in to the school to speak to Year 10 and 11 students, as well as parents, in October as they enter the crucial GCSE years.

If you’d like to know more about the Pause, visit www.lifebydanielle.com or contact me directly.